REVIEW: Rachel Creeger Hinayni! @ The Garrick, Whitefield

It’s always a joy to see a comic in the process of honing a new show before a tour…

And this was no exception. Rachel Creeger will be a familiar name to some in the Jewish community, but, sadly, not to those outside of it.

When she brought her last show, “It’s no job for a nice Jewish girl” to the Greater Manchester fringe two years ago and won “Best Comedy”, I for one was not surprised to see the show go on to sell out it’s entire Edinburgh run.

This show is a little different. Still a work in progress, Rachel takes the audience on a tour of Hinayni! from primary school all the way to her medical problems and syndromes to the present day.

Approaching the show from a fan’s point of view, it was a real pleasure to welcome Rachel back to the Garrick, and it’s intimate space. From a critical view, Rachel was bang on form, letting the audience meander with her as she scribbled notes and made adjustments to the set as she went along.

Working without a microphone to an attentive audience who were happy to be entertained by a performer who appears very at home on the stage. Remember, this is the same artist who happily entertained over 4000 in Trafalgar square at Chanukah in 2018!

I wont spoil the show, but there are gags a plenty, and a special mention goes to her husband, who gets his own gag as a personal present…After all, its those sort of handmade gifts that make a marriage.

If you get chance to catch the show when it hits the Edinburgh fringe, do so. Tickets will undoubtedly be hard to come by, but I assure you, seeing Rachel Creeger live is worth the effort.

5*

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REVIEW: Strangeways, Here We Come

Here we have a movie that has been roundly panned by the (mainly) London bubble of reviewers. Indeed, the Guardian gave it just one *.

Lets have a proper look…

OK, I’ll freely admit, this movie isn’t going to bother any award ceremonies, but if it had been set in Hoxton, Brixton or any of the London “sink” estates, then the plaudits would be gushing, but outside of the London media darling bubble, the film is being enjoyed by pretty much everyone who goes to see it.

It’s a good laugh. What more do you want from 90 minutes of movie?

Its written to please an audience, not reviewers. I’ve lived in Salford, as well as on council estates across the North, and can testify that there isn’t a single character in this film that couldn’t be found on any estate, anywhere in the North of England.

Writer Chris Green knows his audience, and knows the area that the film is set. So complaining that they are caricatures in “implausible situations”  tells me that the writer has never set foot, never mind lived, on such an estate.

I enjoyed this, and so did the rest of the audience at Salford Arts theatre, where this film ended its run tonight with two showings.

As I say, it wont be winning any Oscars, but it is what it is, a bit of fun, set on an estate where people deal drugs, loan sharks are bas***ds who deserve a good kicking and people take drugs at weekend parties to escape the mundane boring life that Austerity Britain has become.

If you cant go into see this (or any piece of art) with an open mind, don’t bother, but I assure you that if you do, you will have a laugh.

It wont be a belly laugh for the full 90 minutes, but you will smirk, laugh out loud at times and leave with a smile plastered across your face.

If you want gritty, indy art house, look elsewhere. This film is aimed at the working class it portrays, maybe larger than life, but then, how else are they supposed to be played?

Ignore the mainstream media critics. What do they actually know about life on a council estate?

More than likely nothing, or if they did, they’ve long ago moved into middle class mediocrity and are denying their past…

Me?

3*/5

Andrew Riley interviews…Episode one

The first in a series of informal interviews with local artists sees Andrew at Salford Arts Theatre to chat to Scott T. Berry.