REVIEW: Bette and Joan, Hope Mill theatre, Manchester.

If you have no idea who Bette Davis and Joan Crawford were, then look away…

Arguably, two of cinemas greatest female stars only ever appeared together once, and that was long after their hayday.

This play, written by Anton Burge and directed by Sue Jenkins, brings the two faded stars of the silver screen together before and after the infamous “Whatever happened to Baby Jane?” lifting scene.

For a two handed play, this certainly made the most use of the limited, but wonderful space at Hope Mill Theatre. The rear of the stage used as a corridor between the two dressing rooms, and the front as a space for flashback pieces.

Our two protagonists are played (magnificently) Julie Edwards as Bette Davis and Kerry Willison-Parry as Joan Crawford. Both actresses more than inhabit their roles, they truly became them. The audience at Hope Mill was full of fans of both the original stars, and I did overhear at least one audience member at the interval say just how impressed he was with BOTH actresses as they were so accurate in their portrayal.

This play was produced by the Wise Fools theatre company, which has as its aim to produce work that celebrates the positivity and possibilities of later life. This is their first production, exploring how women can fight for later life opportunities. They have also been part funded for this by the Arts Council England, National lottery.

All I can say is that this work was simply outstanding. The two images you see on the photo below are not, s both my companion and myself thought projections, but actual photos that spin out of sight! This was done so deftly that we were both astounded to learn that this was not the case.

The juxtaposition of having the younger versions of Bette and Joan looming over the two older versions is inspired.

Bette & Joan

Bette & Joan, Hope Mill Theatre.

The whole show is simply, yet effectively directed by Sue Jenkins (Brookside, Coronation St.) and flows thanks to both actresses being absolutely perfect for the roles. I only recall one slip up delivering lines across each other, and that was because I made a note of it.

This is a superb show, with a very limited run and number of tickets remaining.

Get one!

5*/5*

 

 

REVIEW: Rachel Creeger Hinayni! @ The Garrick, Whitefield

It’s always a joy to see a comic in the process of honing a new show before a tour…

And this was no exception. Rachel Creeger will be a familiar name to some in the Jewish community, but, sadly, not to those outside of it.

When she brought her last show, “It’s no job for a nice Jewish girl” to the Greater Manchester fringe two years ago and won “Best Comedy”, I for one was not surprised to see the show go on to sell out it’s entire Edinburgh run.

This show is a little different. Still a work in progress, Rachel takes the audience on a tour of Hinayni! from primary school all the way to her medical problems and syndromes to the present day.

Approaching the show from a fan’s point of view, it was a real pleasure to welcome Rachel back to the Garrick, and it’s intimate space. From a critical view, Rachel was bang on form, letting the audience meander with her as she scribbled notes and made adjustments to the set as she went along.

Working without a microphone to an attentive audience who were happy to be entertained by a performer who appears very at home on the stage. Remember, this is the same artist who happily entertained over 4000 in Trafalgar square at Chanukah in 2018!

I wont spoil the show, but there are gags a plenty, and a special mention goes to her husband, who gets his own gag as a personal present…After all, its those sort of handmade gifts that make a marriage.

If you get chance to catch the show when it hits the Edinburgh fringe, do so. Tickets will undoubtedly be hard to come by, but I assure you, seeing Rachel Creeger live is worth the effort.

5*

REVIEW: Strangeways, Here We Come

Here we have a movie that has been roundly panned by the (mainly) London bubble of reviewers. Indeed, the Guardian gave it just one *.

Lets have a proper look…

OK, I’ll freely admit, this movie isn’t going to bother any award ceremonies, but if it had been set in Hoxton, Brixton or any of the London “sink” estates, then the plaudits would be gushing, but outside of the London media darling bubble, the film is being enjoyed by pretty much everyone who goes to see it.

It’s a good laugh. What more do you want from 90 minutes of movie?

Its written to please an audience, not reviewers. I’ve lived in Salford, as well as on council estates across the North, and can testify that there isn’t a single character in this film that couldn’t be found on any estate, anywhere in the North of England.

Writer Chris Green knows his audience, and knows the area that the film is set. So complaining that they are caricatures in “implausible situations”  tells me that the writer has never set foot, never mind lived, on such an estate.

I enjoyed this, and so did the rest of the audience at Salford Arts theatre, where this film ended its run tonight with two showings.

As I say, it wont be winning any Oscars, but it is what it is, a bit of fun, set on an estate where people deal drugs, loan sharks are bas***ds who deserve a good kicking and people take drugs at weekend parties to escape the mundane boring life that Austerity Britain has become.

If you cant go into see this (or any piece of art) with an open mind, don’t bother, but I assure you that if you do, you will have a laugh.

It wont be a belly laugh for the full 90 minutes, but you will smirk, laugh out loud at times and leave with a smile plastered across your face.

If you want gritty, indy art house, look elsewhere. This film is aimed at the working class it portrays, maybe larger than life, but then, how else are they supposed to be played?

Ignore the mainstream media critics. What do they actually know about life on a council estate?

More than likely nothing, or if they did, they’ve long ago moved into middle class mediocrity and are denying their past…

Me?

3*/5

Andrew Riley interviews…Episode one

The first in a series of informal interviews with local artists sees Andrew at Salford Arts Theatre to chat to Scott T. Berry.

 

 

REVIEW: MNIB The Glitch

Sometimes, great music appears on your radar from unexpected places.

That’s what happened with “The Glitch” by Manchester act MNIB.

I found myself chatting with a new work colleague when he happened to mention he was an artist, so, naturally, being a journalist, I asked him what he made and lo and behold, MNIB (My Name Is Billal) was on my radar and my playlists.

I have to say, as someone whose musical tastes have a broad range, I didn’t expect to be as blown away as I was.

Northern grime never sounded so good. Dropping onto my Spotify list via MNIB himself, each track is short, sweet and stings like a short jab from Golovkin.

The Glitch may well be explicit and not easy listening in front of your maiden aunt, but its as Mancunian as Oasis, and as hardcore as any other act you’ll hear.

Stand out tracks include “Save some belly”, “Dog Fight” and “The Glitch”, but for me the longer track of “No Stopping You” really hit the spot.

An album that looks both out and is introspective at the same time, MNIB delights in his ability to use expletives not to shock, but to actually put his point across in a manner that makes the album really jump out. Lyrically, it can sound a bit passe at times, but the quality of the production and the maturity of the writing makes it an easy flaw to overlook.

This could have so easily veered into self parody, but it straddles a line, and although not a colossus, it’s certainly an album you’ll enjoy listening to again, unlike some other acts you’ll discover.

 

MNIB Wants YOU

MNIB Wants YOU

I’ll certainly be keeping an ear out for other tracks, and, even if I can’t play it in front of some of the more easily upset members of the household, its worth keeping on Spotify for those hours when I’m alone in the car…